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Eastern Shore Land Conservancy is committed to preserving and sustaining the vibrant communities of the Eastern Shore and the lands and waters that connect them.

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Eastern Shore Conservation Center Tag

New Installation Inside the Eastern Shore Conservation Center

Utilizing open space and some compelling imagery that was originally created for a 2018 exhibit, Pat Rogan of Washington, D.C.-based creative studio Assemble and ESLC staff recently installed some conservation-charged decor to the Eastern Shore Conservation Center. ESLC originally had the exhibit pieces created as a part of Shore Explorations, a month-long studio where participants strolled through Easton's Waterfowl Building exploring the Shore's history, ecosystem, and culture to seek a better understanding of their past, present, and future on the Mid-Shore. "It is always a thrill to work with experts to try to illustrate a grand vision that helps others imagine what is possible," says Rogan. "After first learning about the critical and innovative work of ESLC, I began to look at the rapidly changing landscapes of Delmarva differently. Instead of just feeling threatened by what is being lost with change, I started to see the power of people coming together to shape change while honoring and protecting our region's rural heritage." Once an abandoned eyesore on a main downtown Easton thoroughfare, the Eastern Shore Conservation Center was rehabilitated by ESLC into a LEED-certified, mixed-use campus housing a suite of nonprofit partners, local businesses, and apartments. The building was purposely designed with space to accommodate members from our community - large and small conference rooms, kitchen area, and outside courtyard all provide an uniquely urban and resourceful backdrop for any group or class needing space to host a meeting, party, or conference. For more information on renting space, please contact ESLC Facilities & Administrative Manager Owen Bailey at 410.690.4603.

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Did you know? ESLC headquarters is LEED certified

Here at ESLC, we believe in the old adage, 'If you talk it, you walk it'. With this in mind, ensuring that the future Eastern Shore Conservation Center (or ESCC) -- reimagined from the abandoned and downtrodden McCord Laundry building in downtown Easton -- would be a sustainable, LEED certified building, was never in question. After all, our Center for Towns Program has been actively promoting infill development and smart growth strategies in an effort to strengthen our rural towns for the better part of a decade. Our partnership with Baltimore's Cross Street Partners on The Packing House in Cambridge is a perfect example of these efforts. But what exactly does LEED mean? Simply put, LEED is green building. LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. Available for virtually all building, community, and home project types, LEED provides a framework to create healthy, highly efficient, and cost-saving green buildings. LEED certification is a globally recognized symbol of sustainability achievement. LEED buildings save energy, water, resources, generate less waste, and support human health. LEED buildings also attract tenants, cost less to operate, and boost employee productivity and retention. If you haven't taken a stroll through the Center yet, please do! We welcome visitors during normal business hours (M-F, 8:30am to 4:30pm) to take in our campus. A true mixed-use facility, ESCC tenants include (environmentally-focused) nonprofit organizations, for-profit businesses, apartments, office rental space, and a cafe.  

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Bailey steps up recycling efforts at Eastern Shore Conservation Center

The following email, sent to all tenants of the Eastern Shore Conservation Center from ESLC's Facilities & Administrative Manager Owen Bailey, outlines the efforts made by ESLC (led by Bailey) in making the Center a zero-waste facility. We're sharing it here for others to read, as perhaps it will prove useful to you as well:) "Over the weekend I listened to a podcast on recycling from Stuff You Should Know. It reinforced our efforts on recycling as they argued Single Stream Recycling is too inefficient since too much of the materials are contaminated with food or items people hope can be recycled but can’t. When a recycling company receives a container full of too many contaminates, they throw the whole bin out, regardless of what recyclables are in there. The episode went further into what can(not) be recycled and why. I wanted to use this as an opportunity update you all on our Zero Waste efforts. The good news is we have been recycling a lot more materials than before. Battery recycling and CFL bulbs are going well. We are recycling more plastic with the #6 plastic cups and #5 plastic yogurt containers. That said, there are a lot of materials that end up in the recycling bins that I end up throwing away. Below are the most common items that do not get recycled. Sprout containers: The green containers can be cleaned and given back to Eat Sprout who will reuse them. The other containers (oatmeal bowls and brownies) are compostable and should go in the trash. Straws: We can’t recycle straws (material is too cheap to spend money on recycling). I would encourage everyone to not use plastic straws or use paper/reusable straws made from metal. Recently Seattle banned straws and I predict (and hope) more states and cities will follow. Paper coffee

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Hurricane Harvey relief effort ships to Texas!

On Monday, September 11th, our Hurricane Harvey relief effort shipped officially left for Texas. WIN Trucking picked up all donated goods collected here at the Eastern Shore Conservation Center. ESLC thanks everyone for their support and generosity while we were gathering supplies for victims of Hurricane Harvey in southeast Texas. Staff, building partners, community members, and local businesses all showed outstanding support for a very worthwhile cause! Thanks to you, we shipped: 58 large boxes of food & supplies; 6 bedding sets/blankets; 7 cases of water; 11 large bags of dry cat/dog food; 6 cases of canned cat/dog food; and countless rolls of toilet paper and paper towels. We collected $265.00 in monetary donations for the Houston Food Bank as well. Pictured (right): Staff from Shore United Bank collected items all week long, delivering them in person on Monday prior to the truck arriving. Thank you Shore United Bank!

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Climate Change Conference to be Held in Easton, April 1st

EASTON – The Eastern Shore is the third most susceptible region to the effects of sea level rise in the country. The Eastern Shore Land Conservancy (ESLC), a progressive, environmentally-focused nonprofit organization headquartered in Easton, will host the half-day conference, Unsinkable Eastern Shore II: Rural America Responds to Climate Change, on Saturday, April 1st from 9am to 1pm. The event will be held at the Eastern Shore Conservation Center – the former McCord laundry facility which ESLC rehabilitated and has since occupied with several other conservation groups since 2015. The event is $20 to attend and includes breakfast, two panel discussions, and presentations by two keynote speakers. Also included with admission is a copy of speaker John Englander’s book High Tide on Main Street, which Politico Magazine called “one of the 50 most important books to read in 2016.” Attendees may register online but are encouraged to do so soon, as seating is limited. The conference will be hosted by ESLC’s Coastal Resilience Manager, Brian Ambrette, who has been working with town and county government on the Mid and Upper Shore for more than two years, helping to bring awareness about the effects of climate change – most notably, sea level rise – as well as working to help implement sound planning in the form of mitigation strategies and town/county comprehensive plans. “I hope our audience will learn how their communities and their neighbors are embracing change as an opportunity to innovate and make the systems we rely on stronger and greener”, notes Ambrette. “I am excited about the new ideas that our keynote speakers will inject into the conversation.” While the conference panels boast a mix of knowledgeable educators and emergency management professionals, the inclusion of oceanographer, author, and consultant John Englander is perhaps the most impressive addition to the conference. As a leading

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Recent Posts

  • Eastern Shore Towns Respond to COVID-19
  • This Is Why I Preserve: Pat Langenfelder
  • Climate Study Predicts Extent of Heavier Rains on Eastern Shore
  • This Is Why I Preserve: Alexander Walls
  • LYON RUM Distillery announces final batch of ESLC Black Rum
  • The First Look at Severe Rainfall Impacts in Maryland
  • This Is Why I Preserve: Matt Tobriner
  • This Is Why I Preserve: Carol Bean
  • Chesapeake Bay Architects Discuss Design and Climate Adaptation
  • This Is Why I Preserve: Rob Etgen
  • Thriving – Not Simply Surviving – in the Delmarva Oasis
  • Saving the Stacks
  • Buy Local Challenge: Cookin’ with Carol
  • It Was a Beautiful Day for a LANDJAM!
  • Cannery Park Planting and Clean Up