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Eastern Shore Land Conservancy is committed to preserving and sustaining the vibrant communities of the Eastern Shore and the lands and waters that connect them.

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New Installation Inside the Eastern Shore Conservation Center

Utilizing open space and some compelling imagery that was originally created for a 2018 exhibit, Pat Rogan of Washington, D.C.-based creative studio Assemble and ESLC staff recently installed some conservation-charged decor to the Eastern Shore Conservation Center. ESLC originally had the exhibit pieces created as a part of Shore Explorations, a month-long studio where participants strolled through Easton's Waterfowl Building exploring the Shore's history, ecosystem, and culture to seek a better understanding of their past, present, and future on the Mid-Shore. "It is always a thrill to work with experts to try to illustrate a grand vision that helps others imagine what is possible," says Rogan. "After first learning about the critical and innovative work of ESLC, I began to look at the rapidly changing landscapes of Delmarva differently. Instead of just feeling threatened by what is being lost with change, I started to see the power of people coming together to shape change while honoring and protecting our region's rural heritage." Once an abandoned eyesore on a main downtown Easton thoroughfare, the Eastern Shore Conservation Center was rehabilitated by ESLC into a LEED-certified, mixed-use campus housing a suite of nonprofit partners, local businesses, and apartments. The building was purposely designed with space to accommodate members from our community - large and small conference rooms, kitchen area, and outside courtyard all provide an uniquely urban and resourceful backdrop for any group or class needing space to host a meeting, party, or conference. For more information on renting space, please contact ESLC Facilities & Administrative Manager Owen Bailey at 410.690.4603.

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Did you know? ESLC headquarters is LEED certified

Here at ESLC, we believe in the old adage, 'If you talk it, you walk it'. With this in mind, ensuring that the future Eastern Shore Conservation Center (or ESCC) -- reimagined from the abandoned and downtrodden McCord Laundry building in downtown Easton -- would be a sustainable, LEED certified building, was never in question. After all, our Center for Towns Program has been actively promoting infill development and smart growth strategies in an effort to strengthen our rural towns for the better part of a decade. Our partnership with Baltimore's Cross Street Partners on The Packing House in Cambridge is a perfect example of these efforts. But what exactly does LEED mean? Simply put, LEED is green building. LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. Available for virtually all building, community, and home project types, LEED provides a framework to create healthy, highly efficient, and cost-saving green buildings. LEED certification is a globally recognized symbol of sustainability achievement. LEED buildings save energy, water, resources, generate less waste, and support human health. LEED buildings also attract tenants, cost less to operate, and boost employee productivity and retention. If you haven't taken a stroll through the Center yet, please do! We welcome visitors during normal business hours (M-F, 8:30am to 4:30pm) to take in our campus. A true mixed-use facility, ESCC tenants include (environmentally-focused) nonprofit organizations, for-profit businesses, apartments, office rental space, and a cafe.  

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Pop Up event draws solid crowd for Shore Explorations exhibit

On Tuesday, October 4th, ESLC and UMCES Horn Point Laboratory co-hosted a pop up party at the Waterfowl Building in downtown Easton. The occasion - to highlight our organizations' current projects and new, museum-quality pieces that are currently featured in the Shore Explorations exhibit. Approximately 100 locals came through the doors between 5pm and 7pm, speaking with staff, viewing slideshows and exhibit materials. Free beverages and snacks were made available to party attendees. Many thanks to Shore Explorations creator Patrick Rogan, who created the exhibit in order to show the synergistic relationships between the cultural, historical, and scientific/environmental qualities that make the Eastern Shore a truly special place. Rogan also worked closely with Talbot County Public Schools, the Talbot Historical Society, and the Frederick Douglass Honor Society during his Bicentennial year. ESLC's new images and multimedia exhibit pieces will be on display at its 2018 Party to Preserve event, held on Saturday, October 27th at Chateau Bu-De in Chesapeake City, MD.

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232 acres in Talbot County permanently protected

The Maryland Environmental Trust, partnering with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy, has permanently protected 232 acres of farm and forest land along Maryland Route 33, known as the Chesapeake Country Scenic Byway. Gannon Family LLC granted a conservation easement on what is locally called “Lee Haven Farm,” forever protecting the prime agricultural land and scenic views. The Board of Public Works approved the easement Dec. 6. “We are grateful to keep this land a productive part of the local economy and to protect the scenic view on the Eastern Shore,” Maryland Environmental Trust Director Bill Leahy said. The easement is located in Talbot County immediately outside the town of Easton. It consists of about 100 acres of farmland and 125 acres of forest. The southernmost portion of the property is along the headwaters of Dixon Creek. “We have placed conservation easements on other Talbot County properties and are pleased to have worked with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and Maryland Environmental Trust to preserve a large part of Lee Haven,” Greg Gannon, an owner of Gannon Family LLC, said. Gannon Family LLC donated the land for conservation. Eastern Shore Land Conservancy Conservation Easement Program Manager Jared Parks said the land currently is listed in Easton’s greenbelt. The forest section is habitat for the Delmarva fox squirrel, which is no longer endangered but is still a species of concern, and “it’s got a lot of great farm land,” Parks said. “It is a great easement and it is in an area that we want to see preserved as greenbelt, stay active in farming and open,” Parks said. Farming can still happen on the land, but under the easement no commercial, industrial or residential development is allowed, and that provision literally lasts forever and follows the land, not the owner. “That allows them to continue to own it, farm it, do

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Why Eastern Shore residents should care about saving the Historic Tax Credit

Caught up in the current effort to reform the federal tax code is a critical program that has completed nearly $25 million worth of rehabilitated historic buildings on Maryland’s Eastern Shore since 2002. The Federal Historic Tax Credit (HTC) is a 20% credit on the cost of rehabilitating a historic building and is a powerful and efficient tool for revitalizing our nation’s small towns and cities. For every $1 invested by the federal government, the program attracts nearly $4 in private investment. Better yet, for every $1 in credits, the program returns $1.20 to the federal treasury – actually yielding a profit for the government. The results have been stunning and have changed the outlook for many communities. On Maryland’s Eastern Shore the program has a long history of revitalizing communities while also saving important historic buildings. Since 2002, in Easton alone the program has incentivized the rehabilitation of $10 million worth of buildings – from main street shops to former industrial buildings. A perfect example is the McCord Laundry facility, home to the Eastern Shore Conservation Center – a mixed-use campus of nonprofit organizations, businesses, and apartments. In Cambridge, the program is supporting the rebirth of Race Street, providing critical equity to make the rehabilitation of the Hearn Hardware Building a reality. The formerly vacant and crumbling building will now host market rate apartments and first floor retail space; yet another positive outcome thanks to the Historic Tax Credit. Elsewhere in Cambridge, the Historic Tax Credit is incentivizing an ambitious and potentially catalytic project that will convert the vacant Phillips Packing Co.’s Factory F into a hub of commerce, industry, and education. Without the Historic Tax Credit and the New Market Tax Credit program, which is also seriously threatened, tackling difficult projects like this in rural communities would not be possible. Repeal of

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