Eastern Shore Land Conservancy

232 acres in Talbot County permanently protected


The Maryland Environmental Trust, partnering with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy, has permanently protected 232 acres of farm and forest land along Maryland Route 33, known as the Chesapeake Country Scenic Byway.

Gannon Family LLC has granted a conservation easement on 232 acres of the “Lee Haven Farm” on state Route 33 outside Easton.

Gannon Family LLC granted a conservation easement on what is locally called “Lee Haven Farm,” forever protecting the prime agricultural land and scenic views. The Board of Public Works approved the easement Dec. 6.

“We are grateful to keep this land a productive part of the local economy and to protect the scenic view on the Eastern Shore,” Maryland Environmental Trust Director Bill Leahy said.

The easement is located in Talbot County immediately outside the town of Easton. It consists of about 100 acres of farmland and 125 acres of forest. The southernmost portion of the property is along the headwaters of Dixon Creek.

“We have placed conservation easements on other Talbot County properties and are pleased to have worked with the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and Maryland Environmental Trust to preserve a large part of Lee Haven,” Greg Gannon, an owner of Gannon Family LLC, said.

Gannon Family LLC donated the land for conservation.

Eastern Shore Land Conservancy Conservation Easement Program Manager Jared Parks said the land currently is listed in Easton’s greenbelt. The forest section is habitat for the Delmarva fox squirrel, which is no longer endangered but is still a species of concern, and “it’s got a lot of great farm land,” Parks said.

“It is a great easement and it is in an area that we want to see preserved as greenbelt, stay active in farming and open,” Parks said.

Farming can still happen on the land, but under the easement no commercial, industrial or residential development is allowed, and that provision literally lasts forever and follows the land, not the owner.

“That allows them to continue to own it, farm it, do their open working lands kind of stuff on it, and then pass it on to heirs, sell it,” Parks said. “The restrictions of the easement go with the property forever and ever.”

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